Thursday, September 30, 2010

Kids with ADHD more likely to have missing DNA

Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are twice as likely to have missing or extra chromosomes than other children - the first evidence that the disorder is genetic, a new study says.

British researchers compared the genomes of 366 white British children from 5 to 17 years old with attention deficit hyperactivity, or ADHD, to those of more than 1,000 similar children without the disorder. The scientists focused on a sequence of genes linked to brain development that has previously been connected to conditions like autism and schizophrenia.

In children without ADHD, about 7 percent of them had deleted or doubled chromosomes in the analyzed gene sequence. But among children with the disorder, researchers discovered about 14 percent had such genetic alterations. Scientists also found that 36 percent of children with learning disabilities in the study had the chromosomal abnormalities.


Source and More:
http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/E/EU_MED_ADHD_KIDS_GENETICS?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2010-09-30-04-32-33

Parenting Children With Adhd: 10 Lessons That Medicine Cannot Teach (APA Lifetools)
The Gift of ADHD Activity Book: 101 Ways to Turn Your Child's Problems into Strengths (Companion)
Learning To Slow Down & Pay Attention: A Book for Kids About Adhd

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