Monday, June 14, 2010

Teen boys who attempted suicide more like to abuse partners as adults

Young men who attempt suicide before age 18 are much more likely as adults to be aggressive toward their girlfriends or wives, including hitting and injuring their partners, according to a new study.

This groundbreaking new research provides further evidence of the need for intervention with suicidal teens. It is based on data from 153 males from higher-crime neighborhoods who were assessed yearly from ages 10 to 32, and their romantic partners who participated when the men were ages 18 to 25.

The study, funded by the National Institutes of Health, is published online in the journal Psychological Medicine.

According to the study's authors, David Kerr of Oregon State University and Deborah Capaldi of the Eugene-based Oregon Social Learning Center, the magnitude of the association between a suicide attempt and injury of a partner was surprising: 58 percent of youth in that study group who attempted suicide went on to injure a partner, compared to 23 percent of young men who did not attempt suicide.

"The study began when these men were kids, before anyone knew who was going to become violent," said Kerr, an assistant professor of psychology at OSU who studies youth suicide, depression, and health-risking behaviors. "That is quite different from research that starts with violent men, or women from a domestic violence shelter, and tries to look back in time for explanations."


Source and More:
http://www.physorg.com/news195707915.html

When Violence Begins at Home: A Comprehensive Guide to Understanding and Ending Domestic AbuseIt's My Life Now: Starting Over After an Abusive Relationship or Domestic Violence, 2nd Edition

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