Friday, April 9, 2010

Annual chlamydia screening may not protect women from pelvic inflammatory disease

It is unlikely that single screening for chlamydia will prevent women developing pelvic inflammatory disease in the following year, according to research published in the British Medical Journal today.

The study concludes that most cases of pelvic inflammatory disease occurred in women who did not have chlamydia infection when they were screened, suggesting they may have become infected later.

The authors call on policy makers to publicise the recommendations of the national chlamydia screening programme that in addition to annual screening, individuals should be tested for chlamydia whenever they have a new sexual partner.

Chlamydia is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the USA and Europe with over 3 million new infections diagnosed each year. The infection often has no symptoms and remains undiagnosed. This is concerning because untreated chlamydia in women can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) which can result in infertility, chronic pelvic pain and ectopic pregnancy.

The authors, led by Dr Pippa Oakeshott from St George's, University of London, recruited 2529 sexually active female students between the ages of 16 to 27 from 20 universities and further education colleges in London.

The participants completed questionnaires, provided vaginal swabs and agreed to a follow-up after one year. Written consent was obtained from everyone involved in the study.


Source and More:
http://www.physorg.com/news190002132.html

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