Friday, October 24, 2008

ADHD Related Articles

I just wanted to lump these article here into one post as they all go together.
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ADHD Increases Nicotine Dependence
A new study finds young people with attention deficit disorder (ADHD) are not only at increased risk of starting to smoke cigarettes, they also tend to become more seriously addicted to tobacco and more vulnerable to environmental factors such as having friends or parents who smoke.
Researchers also found that individuals with more ADHD-related symptoms, even those who don’t have the full syndrome, are at greater risk of becoming dependent on nicotine than those with fewer symptoms.
“Knowing that ADHD increases the risk of more serious nicotine addiction stresses the importance of prevention efforts aimed at adolescents and their families,” says Timothy Wilens, MD, director of the Substance Abuse Program in the MGH Pediatric Psychopharmacology Department, who led the study.

Source and More:
http://psychcentral.com/news/2008/10/24/adhd-increases-nicotine-dependence/3194.html
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ADHD Med Does Not Reduce Smoking
Researchers discover bupropion, a popular ADHD medication, does not reduce the risk of smoking among young people receiving treatment for ADHD. Interestingly, the medication has been found to help smoking cessation among adults.
Bupropion is sold under the trade name Wellbutrin when it’s prescribed to treat depression or seasonal affective disorder, and Zyban when used to help people stop smoking.
The report, found in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry , did find that some stimulants to appear to reduce the likelihood of smoking. The finding is significant because children with ADHD are at high risk for nicotine dependence.
Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, evaluated the effects of bupropion on smoking prevention in a study of 57 ADHD patients of both sexes ages 9 to 18 years.
The study group was randomly assigned to daily bupropion or placebo and were followed for an average of 1 year.

Source and More:
http://psychcentral.com/news/2007/08/31/adhd-med-does-not-reduce-smoking/1217.html

1 comment:

Nicole said...

Some great resources here! Many thanks for sharing!

Nicole
http://r.evie.ws/view-review/overcome-adhd